NERIC 2017 Speakers

Calvin Vary, PhD

Calvin Vary, PhD

Faculty Scientist III

Education

BS: North Carolina State
PhD: Michigan State University
Postdoctoral Training: Syracuse University

Research

Regulation of Blood Vessel Formation and the Etiology of HHT

Vary_Fig1aBlood vessel formation is a multi-step process. Endoglin is a TGFβ/ bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) coreceptor for the TGFβ/BMP receptor, ALK1, both of which are required for angiogenesis. In humans, haploinsufficiency of endoglin or ALK1 results in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), a vascular disease characterized by a loss of arteriovenous identity and aberrant vSMC incorporation in fragile vessels.

Our research is focused on the roles of TGFβ/BMP signaling via endoglin and ALK1 in cardiovascular development and disease. Our work takes advantage of our state-of-the-art mass spectrometry core facility. Recent discoveries include BMP9-directed changes in endothelial cell protein chemokine signatures, including the regulation of SDF1 and MCP1 by BMP9 (Young et al., Blood, 2012) and BMP9 signaling crosstalk with the Hippo pathway, a regulator of endothelial cell mechanotransduction (Young et al., PLOS ONE 2015).

More recent interests include: 1) the interaction of the BMP and Notch signaling pathways in endothelial cell signaling, 2) the requirement for endoglin in embryonic vascular patterning carried out by Pax3-positive vascular cell progenitor cells (See Figure, “Targeted deletion of endoglin in Pax3-positive cells; e9.5 mouse embryonic intersomitic vessels), and 3) the role of BMP9 in the regulation of lipid metabolism.

Selected Publications

Endothelial cell signaling in cardiovascular development and disease. Our laboratory helped to establish endoglin functions in non-endothelial cell niches during embryonic development and in adult disease: we established: a functional role for endoglin in vascular smooth muscle cells arising from the neural crest, cell autonomous roles for endoglin in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells of developing blood vessels, and lymphatic vessels.

Tang Y, Urs S, Boucher J, Bernaiche T, Venkatesh D, Spicer DB, Vary CP, Liaw L. Notch and transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) signaling pathways cooperatively regulate vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation. J Biol Chem. 2010;285(23):17556-63. PMCID:2878520.

Mancini ML, Verdi JM, Conley BA, Nicola T, Spicer DB, Oxburgh LH, Vary CP. Endoglin is required for myogenic differentiation potential of neural crest stem cells. Dev Biol. 2007;308(2):520-33. PMCID:2041841.

Mouta-Bellum C, Kirov A, Miceli-Libby L, Mancini ML, Petrova TV, Liaw L, Prudovsky I, Thorpe PE, Miura N, Cantley LC, Alitalo K, Fruman DA, Vary CP. Organ-specific lymphangiectasia, arrested lymphatic sprouting, and maturation defects resulting from gene-targeting of the PI3K regulatory isoforms p85alpha, p55alpha, and p50alpha. Dev Dyn. 2009;238(10):2670-9. PMCID:2826787.

Mancini ML, Terzic A, Conley BA, Oxburgh LH, Nicola T, Vary CP. Endoglin plays distinct roles in vascular smooth muscle cell recruitment and regulation of arteriovenous identity during angiogenesis. Dev Dyn. 2009;238(10):2479-93. PMCID:2947792.

Novel endoglin-dependent protein expression changes in the vasculature. We contributed to the identification of novel endoglin-dependent functions. Most recently we employed state-of-the-art mass spectrometric approaches to discover and quantify novel endoglin signaling targets, including, endoglin-dependent cancer stromal cell expression of novel proteins such as IGFBP4, and BMP9/endoglin/ALK1-dependent alteration of the SDF1/CXCR4 axis in endothelial cells, conducted in collaboration with Dr. Liaw.

Santibanez JF, Letamendia A, Perez-Barriocanal F, Silvestri C, Saura M, Vary CP, Lopez-Novoa JM, Attisano L, Bernabeu C. Endoglin increases eNOS expression by modulating Smad2 protein levels and Smad2-dependent TGF-beta signaling. J Cell Physiol. 2007;210(2):456-68.

Jerkic M, Rivas-Elena JV, Santibanez JF, Prieto M, Rodriguez-Barbero A, Perez-Barriocanal F, Pericacho M, Arevalo M, Vary CP, Letarte M, Bernabeu C, Lopez-Novoa JM. Endoglin regulates cyclooxygenase-2 expression and activity. Circ Res. 2006;99(3):248-56.

Young K, Conley B, Romero D, Tweedie E, O’Neill C, Pinz I, Brogan L, Lindner V, Liaw L, Vary CP. BMP9 regulates endoglin-dependent chemokine responses in endothelial cells. Blood. 2012;120(20):4263-73. PMCID:3501721.

Young K, Tweedie E, Conley B, Ames JJ, FitzSimons M, Brooks P, Liaw L, Vary CPH. BMP9 crosstalk with the Hippo pathway regulates endothelial cell matricellular and chemokine responses. PLoS ONE. 2015; Apr 24;10(4):e0122892.

Agenda

(Information subject to change)

Wednesday, August 16th

2:00 - 9:00 PM Registration Desk Hours of Operation (Diamond Foyer)
5:00 - 6:00 PM Reception and Poster Session I Setup (Emerald Promenade)
6:00 - 6:15 PM Welcoming Remarks (Emerald I-III Ballrooms) Ralph Budd, MD, Director, Vermont Center for Immunology and Infectious Diseases, UVM College of Medicine, Judith Van Houten, PhD,  Director, Vermont Genetics Network, UVM President Thomas Sullivan and UVM Provost David Rosowsky, PhD
6:15 - 7:30 PM Plated Dinner (Emerald I-III Ballrooms)
7:30 - 9:00 PM Poster Session I (Undergraduate students and Cores) (Emerald Promenade)

Thursday, August 17th

COBRE/INBRE Business Grant Managers Meeting with Arina Kramer, Grants Specialist at the Center for Research Capacity Building, NIGMS (Carlton Boardroom)
7:00 AM - 5:30 PM Registration Desk Hours of Operation (Diamond Foyer)
7:00 - 8:15 AM Breakfast, Career Tables for interested students, Poster Session II Set-up (Exhibition Hall)
8:30 - 9:15 AM Opening Remarks (Emerald I-III Ballrooms) NIGMS staff:
9:30 - 10:00 AM Break and Refreshments (Emerald Promenade)
10:00 - 12:00 PM Concurrent Sessions
  1. Core Presentations of resources available to NERIC investigators (about 20 min each, followed by table discussions with individual Core leaders) (Emerald III Ballroom)
    • Eric Kmiec, PhD, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center & Research Institute, Newark, DE
      "CRISPR-based Gene Editing in Biomedical Research"
    • Youngwook Ahn, PhD, Brown University Transgenics and Gene-Targeting Facility
      “CRISPR/Cas9 Mouse Preparation”
    • Bongsup Cho, PhD, Coordinator INBRE and Professor, The University of Rhode Island
      "Expanding Bioinformatic Core: 3D printing of molecules and viruses!”
    • Nagib Ahsan, PhD, Brown University
      "Proteomics Core Facility"
    • Calvin Vary, PhD, Maine Medical Research Institute
      "Lipidomics"
    • Dwight Matthews, PhD, University of Vermont
      "Metabolomics and 13C-labeling"
  2. Entrepreneurship Workshop: how to turn your innovative ideas into reality. (Emerald II Ballroom)
    • Keynote speaker, Mathew Portnoy, PhD, Overall HHS SBIR/STTR Program Manager, NIH Program Manager, NIH Office of Extramural Programs
    • Pitch presentations by IDeA entrepreneurs
    • Mercedes Rincón, PhD,  Associate Professor, Medicine Immunobiology Program, UVM College of Medicine
      "Welcome to the I-Trep program for IDeA states"
    • Three Round tables, topics to choose
  3. INBRE Program (Emerald I Ballroom)
    • 10:00 - 11:00 AM - Sharon O'Connor, MS, MBA, Internal Evaluation Manager, Dartmouth College, New Hampshire INBRE
      "INBRE Program Evaluation"
    • 11:00 - 12:00 PM - Elizabeth Ambos, PhD, Executive Officer, Council on Undergraduate Research
      "PM Council on Undergraduate Research Presentation"
10:30 - 11:30 AM COBRE/INBRE Business Grant Managers Meeting with Arina Kramer, Grants Specialist at the Center for Research Capacity Building, NIGMS (Carlton Boardroom)
12:00 - 1:30 PM Lunch and Networking (Exhibition Hall)

VGN Baccalaureate Partner Institution Meeting (Carlton Boardroom)
1:30 - 3:30 PM Concurrent Scientific Sessions (solicit themes from PIs and from abstracts received). Development/Genetics (Emerald I Ballroom) Chair, Cancer (Emerald III Ballroom) Chair,
  • Featured Speaker: Patrycja Dubielecka, PhD, Brown University
    “Beyond JAK/STAT: Signaling Pathways Contributing to the Pathogenesis of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms”
Infectious Diseases and Immunology (Emerald II Ballroom) Chair, William Green, PhD, Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth
3:30 - 3:45 PM Break and Refreshments (Emerald Promenade)
3:45 - 4:45 PM Keynote Lecture I (Emerald III Ballroom)
4:45 - 6:00 PM Poster Session II (Graduate students and Postdoctoral Fellows) (Emerald III Ballroom)
6:00 PM Dinner on your own in Burlington

Friday, August 18th

8:00 - 9:00 AM Breakfast (Exhibition Hall)
9:00 - 10:00 AM Cool ideas from IDeA programs (Emerald III Ballroom)
  • Bruce Stanton, PhD, Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth
    “Leveraging COBRE Resources with Philanthropy”
  • Marie Stuart, MD, PI of SCD COBRE Program, Director of Hematology Research A.I. DuPont Hospital for Children
    “Single Disease Centered COBREs…A Novel Approach”
  • W. Kelley Thomas, PhD, Professor, Dept. Molecular, Cellular and Biomedical Sciences, University of New Hampshire
    “Early Undergraduate Experiences in Bioinformatics”
10:00 - 12:00 PM Concurrent Scientific Sessions Neuroscience (Emerald I Ballroom) Chair, Judith Van Houten, PhD
  • Featured Speaker: Matthew E. R. Butchbach, PhD, University of Delaware
    "Characterization of Small Molecule Neuroprotectants for Spinal Muscular Atrophy”

Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Systems (Emerald III Ballroom) Chair, Bruce Stanton, PhD

Bioinformatics, Computational Biology, Complex Systems (Emerald II Ballroom) Chair, Cathy Wu, PhD, Edward G. Jefferson Chair of Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, University of Delaware
  • Featured Speaker: Benjamin King, PhD, University of Maine
  • Featured Speakers: Dr. Malcolm D’Souza and Dr. Derald Wentzien from Delaware INBRE Wesley College
    “Undergraduate Data Science Research Projects Form an Integral Component of the Wesley College Science and Mathematics Curriculum”
12:00 - 1:00 PM Lunch and Networking Box lunches (G's Restaurant)
1:00 PM Conference Concludes